Professional Guidance For Handling Personal Personal Bankruptcy

Deciding to file for personal bankruptcy is a very serious decision to make. It will have repercussions that will follow you for the rest of your life. Bankruptcy laws are not easy for non-lawyers to understand, but the information in this article will help explain what bankruptcy is, and how it can benefit you.

If you are being faced with home foreclosure, wage garnishments or other situations that make it necessary to file for bankruptcy quickly, you may want to explore an emergency filing. Regular bankruptcy filings entail approximately 50 pages of paperwork and one to two weeks for an attorney to pull everything together. In an emergency filing, your attorney can file just the first 2 necessary pages and keep creditors from continuing foreclosure or garnishment proceedings. The rest of the work will be completed afterward.

Do not get an attorney for your bankruptcy when you are feeling overwhelmed. You have got to be levelheaded when you hire a lawyer. After all, you will be expected to pay him/her for services. Find out upfront what you will have to pay any lawyer before you hire one.

If you are planning to file for bankruptcy, you do not need to lose your home, car or other items that you have loans for. If you wish to keep them, however, you must make the payments on a timely basis in order to avoid repossession. If the payments are too much to handle, your bankruptcy attorney may be able to arrange for an evaluation of your loan and negotiate a lower monthly payment. In the case of a home, you may look into a loan modification or refinance to reduce your payment amount.



Always weigh your options carefully prior to deciding to dive head first into filing a bankruptcy claim. For example, consumer credit counseling programs can help if your debt isn't too large. Also, if you just contact your creditors and speak to them plainly and truthfully, the odds are good that you can negotiate a better payment structure that you can afford.

After your bankruptcy has been discharged, or finalized, a good way to begin re-building your credit is to obtain a pre-paid credit card. This type of card is usually available at your local bank. The card is secured by the amount of money you load onto it. http://www.connecticutmag.com/food-drink/coffee-break-connecticut-s-best-coffeehouses/article_d3fcdbbe-97e1-11e7-8620-e761f5955741.html can not charge more than what you have loaded onto the card, so over-spending shouldn't be a problem. It works like a regular credit card, with monthly statements and payments. After you have kept this card in good standing for a period of time, you may be able to have it switched into a regular, revolving credit card.

Be safe and hire an attorney for help. There are many websites these days that claim to walk you through the process of filing bankruptcy on your own. It is cheaper than using an attorney to get you through this time, but it leaves a lot of room for error. This is not something that you want to take chances on.

Meet with many different attorneys before making any decision on one. To do this, you must start looking well in advance of when you need to file. If you wait until the last minute, you will not have the time to find an attorney that will give you good advice, and one that is easy to work with.

You do not need to be bankrupt to file for personal bankruptcy. In 1898 the term was changed from "bankrupt" to "debtor" so that people could more readily understand that an inability to pay bills is the main qualifying factor in filing for personal bankruptcy. Most people who file are not, in fact, completely bankrupt.

Learn about adversarial proceeding. This is what results when you take out cash advances or make big ticket purchases on credit cards within ninety days of your filing date. You could very well be held responsible for the funds that have been withdrawn or purchases made once the bankruptcy is final.

Consider Chapter 13 bankruptcy. If you are receiving money on a regular basis and your unsecured debt is under $250,000, you may be able to file Chapter 13 bankruptcy. This type of bankruptcy protects your assets from seizure and lets you repay your credits over the course of a few years. That plan lasts approximately three to five years, and then you are discharged from unsecured debt. Missing a payment under these plans can result in total dismissal by the courts.

Talk to a credit counselor before deciding to file for bankruptcy. You have to attend an approved credit counseling session anyway in order to file, and a qualified counselor can help you evaluate your options and determine whether bankruptcy is in your best interest. Ask your credit counselor any questions you may have about what type of bankruptcy to file or its effects on your credit.

No matter how trivial you may think it is, all income should be reported in your bankruptcy filing. You can create issues in your bankruptcy if your income information does not flush with bank and finance records. Be sure to include all incomes within the household that can be considered part of your normal income.

If you are planning to file for bankruptcy, you must seriously take into account anyone who has cosigned on a loan for you. For instance, if a friend or relative is a cosigner on your auto or home loan, they will be held financially responsible to pay the debt in the event you file for bankruptcy. This can create problems in relationships between family members and friends. That is why it is not advisable to cosign for anyone or ask someone to cosign for you, including your children. It could ruin someone's life.

Many times people feel forced into filing for bankruptcy. They do not know that debt settlements are available. If your debt is much greater than your income, you could be a candidate for a debt settlement. Many times credit counselors can negotiate with banks and credit card companies to reduce the amount you owe, so that you do not have to file bankruptcy.

Any lawyer that you are considering using should be researched. There are websites where you can check the status of each lawyer in your area. A simple online search will help you find this information. https://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/02/us/loan-monitor-is-accused-of-ruthless-tactics-on-student-debt.html need to make sure the lawyer has a good reputation in filing for bankruptcy.

Don't let bill collectors mislead you. When you discuss bankruptcy with some bill collectors, they may tell you that bankruptcy will not affect them, and you will still have to pay them. They are not being honest, all of your bills can be covered depending on the bankruptcy option that you fiel.

If you are hiring a lawyer, don't be afraid to speak up. Don't assume your lawyer knows everything. If you have concerns, voice them. If there are things you feel your lawyer is overlooking, remind them. Don't be shy about it. Repeat any crucial information that might have been glossed over.


There are a lot of things to know if you want to file for bankruptcy, especially if you are not a lawyer and don't know all of the bankruptcy laws. Use the tips in this article to keep you on the right path. Find out as much as you can, so you can start to improve your finances soon.

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